This article has 4 comments

  1. Urban @Urbanskitchen.com

    Great and well explained video. Have seen a few of them since you started the new channel as well. I tend to enjoy visiting and reading blog though. However like the tunes too. My preferred way to desalt Salt fish is same as yours. I prefer to just soak it though It involves changing the water a few times for the salt removed. Very pure water if possible works best to desalt by Osmosis action of water which is how the desalting takes place.

    As well the pieces of the fish tend to be more plump vs shrunken in size if you had boiled the fish to desalt it.

  2. JehanP

    Thanks! Soaking it is my preferred method also but if I do forget to soak it overnight, I will boil it to remove the salt but that’s always the last resort. Thanks for stopping by and for supporting my channel!

  3. DD

    Hello there, I am super impressed by your website, it is extremely professional and makes West Indian cusine look as good as it tastes. I am originally from Canada and married a Guyanese man 30 years ago, we have three wonderful kids and a grand baby now. I lived in Guyana myself for 2 years and loved it. I have always loved to cook and try all foods from every country, I am not afraid to try anything and am always looking for something new to make or to improve on recipes in my repitoir. I can honestly say that I never cook the same meal twice in one week, I like to give my family a surprise each night with something new. I learned to cook all of the wonderful Guyanese food while I lived there and surprise a lot of people especially when they would see a while lady cooking roti fireside, or a big pot of cook up rice on a Sunday at the lake. I believe in diversity and have always surrounded myself with people from all countries but there is something about West Indian food that I love the most. Guyanese and I gotta say Jamacian are my two top contenders.. I unfortunately had some medical issues for the last 7 years that left me with a hole in my stomach which almost killed me, each time I would eat or drink the food would leak out from the stomach and was poisoning me which caused me to go into septic shock, I was lucky it was caught when it was or I would have died, I spent months in the hospital in Canada but there was no surgeon to help me until the Ministry of Health found a wonderful surgeon in America, I was immediately transferred there where numerous surgeries were performed, unfortunately the first 6-7 were performed within a two month period and none were successful and left me extremely weak and clinging to life, I was unable to EAT or DRINK anything by mouth for over 4 years and relied on tube feedings and TPN which is administer through your veins like an IV which kept me nourished, during this time all I did was look at cooking shows on TV, look up recipes online and when I was allowed to be home I would cook like it was Christmas everyday for the 10 people who lived in my home (mother and mother in law and other family) who helped care for me. Even though I was unable to eat or drink I found comfort seeing them enjoy the food I could not eat but could cook, sounds silly but that honestly gave me purpose everyday and made me happy. There were times I would spend 4-6 months in the hospital bed in Ohio while my family were in Ontario, my dear husband NEVER left my side not even for a day. This started in 2009 and I still have issues, after 16 major surgeries and the majority of my stomach removed as well as my intestineq , my last surgery took a total of 17 hours in the Operating Room (my surgeon noted it was the hardest surgery in his career), with the doctors giving me less than a 20% chance of survival, two times rushed into the ER with septic shock and flat lining twice by the grace of God I am still here where I can now eat and drink very little and unfortunately not a lot of the things I use to enjoy like wiri Wiri peppers but thanks to God and some amazing surgeons, my amazing soul mate and children I am alive and enjoying everything life has to offer. When I came across your recipes the other day while searching for a stew fish recipe I was blown away with the quality of your site, how professional it was, how easy it is to understand and execute and above all the diverse options available, I have already tried 4 recipes and they all turned out amazing (only 1 item I noticed on the rice and peas recipe there was no mention of salt), but nothing else on any others I tried), you should be Extremely proud of your work it is amazing. Most of the recipes/videos etc. I have viewed in the past especially from most West Indian sites have been such poor quality, difficult to understand and a turn off. For someone not familiar with West Indian food they would be extremely lucky if they came across your site first because the quality of the pictures alone make the dishes look fantastic and mouth watering than your description of each dish takes them on a journey to some where they wish they were. All four of the dishes I made from your recipes are things I have cooked myself before but with a little twist it made them better. Thank-you?

    Thank you for keeping true to your Guyanese Roots while exploring and being open to the wonderful cuisine from the surrounding countries. We are all surrounded by diversity and should take a page from your recipe book in our day to day lives and respect each and every country and it’s people for what they offer it would all be delicious! Keep writing, cooking and INSPIRINING!!!!!!!!!!!

  4. JehanP

    Hi DD, I’m so sorry for all the health issues that you’ve experienced but glad to hear that you are doing better. Thank you for all the kind words and the encouragement, it means alot! Here’s you getting better! The rice and peas doesn’t have salt because there is a bouillon that adds some salt but Jamaican rice and peas typically isn’t salted and that’s what this dish was inspired by. Thanks for visiting and for sharing your story.